News

ADA welcomes Scholars!

The Archive of Digital Art expands its field and includes scholars in its documentation. Scholars are invited to become members of the online community and set up their own ADA entry!

Scholars have the possibility to upload publications and text pdfs, announce upcoming events, post comments, document exhibitions, conferences and other relevant events and be represented in the Archive.

The community features also allow the active exchange of professional information with peers and the new “Light box” tool facilitates the examination and comparison of images for research and teaching.

To ensure a high academic standard 5 published articles and/or curated exhibitions are requisite for scholars to become members of the ADA community. Interested scholars may apply for an account here.

Featured Artist/Scholar

Marta de Menezes
*1975
"Marta de Menezes is a Portuguese artist (b. Lisbon, 1975) with a degree in Fine Arts by the University in Lisbon, a MSt in History of Art and Visual Culture by the University of Oxford, and a PhD candidate at the University of Leiden. She has

Works (11), Literature (14)

Exhibition

CODeDOC remediated

curated by

Christiane Paul

NewMediaArt Research

X
Toby Miller 23.03.2017
Free report on issues with the technology/creativity/art fetish of policy wonks and servants of capital hFree report on issues with the technology/creativity/art fetish of policy wonks and servants of capital
http://www.spacestudios.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Artists-in-Tech-Cities-Report.pdf
Oliver Grau 23.03.2017
RE:TRACE 2017: Call for Papers The 7th International Conference on the Histories of Media Art, Science and Technology titled RE:TRACE focuses on an evaluation of the status of the meta-discipline MediaArtHistories today. More than a decade after the first conference founded the field now recognized worldwide as a significant historical inquiry at the intersection of art, science, and technology, Media Art Histories is now firmly established as a dynamic area of study guided by changing media and research priorities, drawing a growing community of scholars, artists and artist-researchers. Immersed in both contemporary and historiographical aspects of the digital world, we explore the most immediate socio-cultural questions of our time: from body futures, information society, and media (r)evolutions, to environmental interference, financial virtualization, and surveillance. And we do so through a fractal lens of inter- and trans-disciplinarity, bridging art history, media studies, neuroscience, psychology, sociology, and beyond. MediaArtHistories is a field whose theory, methods, and objects of study interweave with and overlay other disciplines. The organizing committee invites researchers of different areas, disciplines and practices to submit individual papers, posters and full panels with new and original research preferably in the following themes: - MediaArtHistories – historiographies and futures of an ever-emerging field - Institutional histories of Media Art - Media Art & Politics (surveillance, climate, visualizations, etc.) - Collecting media art / Media Art market - Archiving, preserving and representing Media Art - Re-Use of cultural heritage data, including education, learning and research - Methodologies and research tools for MediaArtHistories with a focus on Digital Humanities - International and local histories and practices of media art - (Post-)Colonial experiences and non-Western histories of media art, science and technology - Paradigm shift – Digital vs. Post-Digital Theory - Alternative histories for Media Art in relation to newly evolving or unexpected fields. - Models and perspectives of research fields adapted across traditional disciplinary lines. - New symbolic architecture of digital super companies (Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, FB, Google) The conference program will include competitively selected, peer-reviewed individual papers, panel presentations and posters, as well as a small number of invited speakers. Presentations will be delivered in a range of formats, from panel discussions to a poster session. We particularly encourage submissions by researchers from international contexts outside of Europe and North America. KEYNOTE LECTURES and DEBATES with Martin KEMP (emeritus professor Oxford University, British Academy, UK) Ryszard KLUSZCZYNSKI (Universität Lodz, PL) Morten SøNDERGAARD (Aalborg University, DAN) t.b.a. t.b.a. Submission Deadline: March 26, 2017 Notification of acceptance will be announced by April 30, 2017. Individual proposals for papers should consist of a max. 250-word abstract with title. Proposals for full panels should consist of a max. 500-word abstract outlining the panel and individual topics of confirmed speakers. Submission language is English. Submitters should upload a short bio file (Word), no longer than ½ page per person. The short bios will be used on the conference website together with your abstracts. Initiated by the Media Art Histories Board (Steering Committee): Dr. Andreas BROECKMANN (Leuphana University Lüneburg, DE); Prof. Dr. Sean CUBITT (Goldsmiths University of London, UK); Univ.-Prof. Dr. Oliver GRAU, MAE (Danube University, AT); Dr. Linda Dalrymple HENDERSON (University of Texas at Austin, US); Prof. Dr. Erkki HUHTAMO (University of California Los Angeles, US); Prof. Dr. Douglas KAHN (University of New South Wales, AU); Prof. Dr. Machiko KUSAHARA (Waseda University Tokyo, JP); Prof. Dr. Tim LENOIR (Stanford University, US); Prof. Dr. Gunalan NADARAJAN (University of Michigan, US); Prof. Dr. Paul THOMAS (University of New South Wales, AU) MAH Honorary Board: Martin KEMP, Jasia REICHARDT, Itsuo SAKANE, Peter WEIBEL, Rudolf ARNHEIM †, Douglas DAVIS † Conference dates: November 23–25 , 2017, Krems (World Cultural Heritage) & Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW) Vienna, hosted by DANUBE UNIVERSITY and ÖAW Co-Chairs RE:TRACE: Oliver GRAU & Inge HINTERWALDNER Austria RE:TRACE: Conference Advisory Board Carl AIGNER (Landesmuseum St. Pölten, AT); Jose Ramon ALCALA (University of Castilla La Mancha, ES); Giselle BEIGUELMAN (University of São Paulo, BR); Beatriz Escribano BELMAR (University of Castilla La Mancha, ES); Andreas BROECKMANN (Leuphana University Lüneburg, DE); Andres BURBANO (Universidad de los Andes, CO); Valentino CATRICALA (University Roma Tre / Media Art Festival, IT); Sebastian EGENHOFER (University of Vienna, AT); Ksenia FEDEROVA (RU/UC Davis, US); Sabine FLACH (University of Graz, AT); Katharina GSÖLLPOINTNER (University of Applied Arts, Vienna, AT); Erkki HUHTAMO (University of California Los Angeles, US); Ryszard KLUSCZYNSKI (University of Lodz, PL); Katja KWASTEK (University of Amsterdam, NL); Daniel Cardoso LLACH (Carnegie Mellon University, US); Sjoukje van der MEULEN (Utrecht University, NL); Gunalan NADARAJAN (University of Michigan, US); Gerald NESTLER (Vienna, A); Ana PERAICA (Split, HR); Christopher SALTER (Concordia University, CA); Christa SOMMERER (University of Art and Design, Linz, AT); Morten SøNDERGAARD (Aalborg University, DK); Axel STOCKBURGER (Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, AT); Gerfried STOCKER (Ars Electronica, Linz, AT); Eveline WANDL-VOGT (ÖAW, Vienna, AT). Venues: Danube University / Located 70km from Vienna in the UNESCO World Heritage Wachau region and Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna Danube University is the only public university in Europe specializing in advanced continuing education by offering low-residency degree programs for working professionals and life-long learners. Located at both a modern university campus and in the Göttweig Monastery, the Dept. for Image Science is an internationally unique institution for research and innovative teaching with an international faculty, at this point 120 scholars from various nations and disciplines. The innovative approach of the Department for Image Science with the close connection to practice has developed the and founded in 2006 the low-residency Master program MediaArtHistories and Futures answering the need for international, post-graduate studies. Austrian Academy of Science, Vienna / The vibrant capital of the Republic of Austria in Central Europe meeting international travel standards with safe and exciting surroundings that embrace culture both old and new. Planning for Vienna is being organized with partner institutions and colleagues. Fast and frequent public transportation between Vienna and Krems allows for a blending of two locations into one venue, distributing separate days in each venue. www.mediaarthistory.org/retrace www.mediacultures.net/mah www.digitalartarchive.at https://www.academia.edu/305…/What_is_MediaArtHistories_.pdf PARTNERS: Danube University, Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW), Academia Europaea (AE), Erasmus+ MediaArtCultures, Archive of Digital Arts (ADA), Leonardo, Humboldt-University Berlin, Kunsthalle Krems
http://www.mediaarthistory.org/retrace
Janina Hoth 23.03.2017
Arte Laguna Exhibition will open this weekend in Venice! Congratulations to all the finalists of the categories VIRTUAL ART and DIGITAL GRAPHICS! www.artelagunaprize.at ARSENALE OF VENICE ̶ March 25, 2017 OPENING AND AWARDS CEREMONY ̶ 11th ARTE LAGUNA PRIZE Open through April 9, free entrance Exhibition of finalists and winners 125 artworks Nappe Arsenale and TIM Future Centre, Venice 26 March – 9 April 2017 hours 10am - 6pm daily Opening ceremony: Saturday, March 25, at 6pm Guided tours: Sunday, March 26 - 11am Nappe Arsenale - 3pm TIM Future Centre - virtual art and digital graphics section IMAGES: SILVANA MALDONADO FOITZICK Chile 1977 - Humanoides 7, 2015, digital photomontage, 70x100cm INGE VAN HEERDE The Netherlands 1996 - Wood, from the series: Magic Tragic, 2015, Digital photography,100x70cm
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1171848589611577&set=gm.1061871503919588&type=3
Jon Cates 23.03.2017
Devon Schiller 21.03.2017
Check out GIRL DESCENDING A STAIRCASE by MEDIA ART HISTORIES alum Nicolas Constantin Romanacci, a new artwork in which experimental glitch also intermedially explores Duchamp and Muybridge!
http://nicolas-constantin.com/work/girl-descending-a-staircase
Denilson LOpes 21.03.2017
Dear Colleagues and Friends at London, Body Electric is the first feature movie by Marcelo Caetano and it is going to be screened at BFI/FLARE (London LGBT Film Festival) (https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/flare/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=bodyelectric) with the presence of the director. He is one of the most interesting filmmakers of his generation. You can check two of his short movies with English subtitles: Bailão (https://vimeo.com/61625670) and Na Sua Companhia (https://vimeo.com/46667865). Please feel free to resend the information to whom may be interested in it. Thanks and best, Denilson Lopes, ECO/UFRJ
https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/flare/Online/default.asp?BOparam%3A%3AWScontent%3A%3AloadArticle%3A%3Apermalink=bodyelectric
Nicolai Cassette 21.03.2017
https://www.facebook.com/notes/segnali-2017-arti-audiovisive-e-performance/segnali-2017-call-for-audiovisual-works-and-live-audio-video-performances/1338973169527923
https://www.facebook.com/notes/segnali-2017-arti-audiovisive-e-performance/segnali-2017-call-for-audiovisual-works-and-live-audio-video-performances/1338973169527923
Hava Aldouby 21.03.2017
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_UqA5XZ1PdaY2l0SVN3WjB4ems Opened last night: "Fragmented Spaces, Spliced identities," a group exhibition featuring 10 Israeli new-media artists (The Open University Gallery, Ra'anana, Israel) Curated by Yael Eylat Van-Essen Featuring Nadav Assor, Shirley Shor, Dana Levy, Guy Yitzhaki, Ilan Green, Peleg Dishon, Ofir Liberman, Liliana Farber, Lila Chitayat, and S. F. Kislev
https://drive.google.com/open
Damiano Garofalo 20.03.2017
CALL FOR PAPERS «Cinema e Storia. Rivista di studi interdisciplinari» n. 1/2018 *From Public to Private. The History and Histories of Audiences in the Global Era* Special issue, edited by Mariagrazia Fanchi & Damiano Garofalo Deadline: March 31, 2017. *** The study of cinema audiences has always been considered as an ancillary area of interest: marginalized and considered to be a trivial subject, and in any case easily studied through text-centric analysis (the spectator as a semiotic construction), a marketing system approach (the spectator as the final result of film industry strategies), or as an outcome of political propaganda operations (the spectator as a tool of consensus). Moving away from this marginal position, in the last few years the study of cinema audiences has obtained a new relevance, assuming a particular significance thanks to the several multidisciplinary investigations of social and cultural history, such as the history of consumption, the history of tastes and, above all, the history of cinema and TV audiences. Several causes have contributed to this recent renewal: the birth of European associations that are devoted specifically to cinema audiences (e.g. HOMER, but also the “Audience” workgroup in NECS) has energized researches in this sense; the shift in focus towards non-Western audiences, has led to the emergence of of a new World History approach and the post-colonial perspective; experiments in new instruments from experimental psychology and statistical sciences (big datas) have contributed, as has the upgrading of traditional media historiography to include archaeological or oral-historical approaches. This positive circumstance has driven a reprise of the historiographical reflection on audiences, and the expansion of studies and projects (among others, the Italian Cinema Audiences project, launched by a pool of British Universities). Beginning with this new perspective, it is necessary to enlarge our frame of work and to adopt a wide and inclusive approach to media consumption, to include cinema, TV and visual and audiovisual experiences broadly. The study of audiences necessitates an intermedial and multidisciplinary approach in order to encompass the complexity of media experiences: the plethora of forms that this assumes (and assumed), their changes through space and time, the multiplicity of connections to cultural, social, economic and identity processes. The challenge is to legitimate audience as essential field of investigation within film, media, communication studies, and, at the same time, to adopt audiences as a historical source in a wider sense. Reflecting on these topics and following this line, the «Cinema e Storia» Journal aims to focus its following issue (1/2018) to history of cinema audiences. We welcome essays that address (though are not limited to) the following topics: • Cinema audiences and historiographical questions; • New approaches of cinema audience history: methods, frames, designs; • Cinema audiences and microhistory (biographical, genealogical, communitarian histories); • Cinema audiences and cultural consumption; • Cinema audiences and production studies; • Cinema audience, sociability and social processes; • The history of reception (movies, stars, genres...); • Fandom and stardom; • History and identity construction (gender, generational, sexual social, cultural, political, national identities); • Histories of movie theatres; histories of movie-going and urban spaces; • Histories of cinema audiences and World History; • Neuroscientific histories of audiences; • Media debates and media representations of movie-goers, movie-going and cinema experiences. To propose an article please send an abstract and short biographical note to the address redazione@cinemaestoria.it by March 31, 2017. Abstracts must be between 200 and 250 words, and may be presented in English or Italian, although completed articles must be in Italian - proofreading will be guaranteed by “Cinema e Storia” editorial board. The proposal should include: five key-words, names of author(s), institution(s) and contact details (email, telephone), together with a short bio for each author. If the proposal is accepted, the author/s will be asked to send the complete article to the same e-mail address by July 31, 2017. Contributions will be sent to two independent reviewers in a double-blind peer review process prior to the final publication decision. Authors may be requested to change or improve their articles if suggested by reviewers. Articles should be between 4,000-5,000 words in length (no more than 35,000 characters, spaces and notes included), but shorter articles will be also considered. For info, please send an email to: mariagrazia.fanchi@unicatt.it and/or damiano.garofalo@uniroma1.it For the Italian version of the callo, please see:
http://www.cinemaestoria.it/
Denilson LOpes 19.03.2017
My contact with the Brazilian generation who have been releasing their first feature films during the course of the twenty‐first century proved decisive for me during the Tiradentes Exhibition, which is one of Brazil's most important film festivals, which I first attended in 2009. I chose to go along above all in order to attend the pre‐screenings of A Fuga da Mulher Gorila/The Escape of the Female Gorilla (2009), directed by Felipe Bragança and Marina Meliande, and No Meu Lugar/In my Place (2009), directed by Eduardo Valente. I'd already heard about the changes that had taken place at the Tiradentes Exhibition as a result of Cléber Eduardo's curatorship. During the week I spent at Tiradentes I was absorbed by the debates which transcended the customary rather monotonous discussions about the creative process and the bitter experience of production which in the past had driven me away from this type of event at exhibitions and festivals. More than the discussions in themselves or any film in particular, though, what aroused my curiosity was the atmosphere at the exhibition – the desire to make a new type of cinema. No, it was no longer simply the gesture of self‐affirmation to do something after the cultural dismantlement brought about by President Fernando Collor de Mello in 1990–1992 which brought the Brazilian film industry to its knees such that it hardly produced any more full‐length feature films. And it wasn't anything like the film-makers of the cinema da retomada (a new type of national cinema), such as Carla Camurati, Walter Salles, and Fernando Meirelles, who came on the scene at the end of the 1990s. No, this was a brand new Brazilian cinema – garage cinema – and it expressed a completely different space. that it hardly produced any more full‐length feature films.2 And it wasn’t anything like the film- makers of the cinema da retomada (a new type of national cinema), such as Carla Camurati, Walter Salles, and Fernando Meirelles, who came on the scene at the end of the 1990s.3 No, this was a brand new Brazilian cinema – garage cinema – and it expressed a completely different space. Indeed, garage cinema has allowed me to reconnect with Brazilian cinema in a way that had only happenedfor me once before with the postmodern or neon‐realist cinema of the 1980s.4 At that time the dictatorship was coming to an end. Indeed, when I went to university in 1984, I came across those urban films that were not intimidated by genre cinema and had come a long way since cinema novo,5 and they made me feel like I belonged existentially to the films being made in Brazil at that time. This was not because of any reverence I might have had for the films themselves or because of their historical significance – in relation to the past – but because I felt they just were the sort of films I would have made if I had been a filmmaker. I returned to the Tiradentes Exhibition in 2010 when I was invited to take part as a jury member. The prize for Best Film was awarded to Estrada para Ythaca/Road to Ythaca (2010), directed by Luiz Pretti, Ricardo Pretti, Pedro Diógenes, and Guto Parente, and the fascination returned – but now there was a whole new set of questions. Yes, it was a lot easier now than in the past to make films with a group of friends, even without raising financing for production and post‐production. Alongside the prize for Best Film I should also mention the significance of the prize awarded to O Céu sobre os Ombros/The Sky Above (2010) directed by Sérgio Borges, at the Brasilia Festival, also in 2010, along with the national as well as international splash caused by O Som ao Redor/Neighbouring Sounds (2012), directed by Kleber Mendonça Filho. But what were the aims of these films? What I saw spoke of an impasse which simply became more and more pronounced. Fast‐forward a few years and those rookie filmmakers were no longer the newcomers. And what do you do when you are no longer a promising young filmmaker? The critic and writer Silviano Santiago once told me in a conversation that the contemporary Brazilian artist has to choose between failure, success, or the fringe.6 If I remember correctly, in Santiago’s opinion, failure meant being an independent artist, success meant working in the media, above all in TV, and the fringe meant a university job. Of course none of those choices came, or indeed come, with ready‐made values; they simply express the ethical dilemmas that each artist has to face up to even if it is a case of deciding in the darkness of his room whether he will keep plugging away at it or throw in the towel. Perhaps these dilemmas should be understood not as permanent choices or what each artist might judge as success or failure but rather as the way in which society constructs the artist and positions him within that society. That is, it is more a question of how the artist is perceived by Brazilian society nowadays. Brazilian society is, after all, distinguished by a cult of celebrity, a concentration of large entertain- ment conglomerates as well as a proliferation of alternative production and distribution outlets. Failure as an ethical and aesthetic attitude could be seen as a key to unlock the meaning of not only Estrada para Ythaca but a number of Brazil’s first‐feature films made in the years since 2010, which have been grouped together under the rubric of garage cinema (Ikeda and Lima 2011, 2012) or post‐industrial cinema (Migliorin 2011) – to this day the secondary literature on this film movement is still sparse, consisting of a sprinkling of short newspaper reviews and a few Master’s dissertations. Radically different from the cinema da retomada of the second half of the 1990s, which sought to reach a large audience by achieving a pragmatic balance between genre‐based cinema and high‐quality production values,7 garage cinema seeks to create an alternative dramaturgy and staging based on reduced production costs by using digital supports and by relying on alternative distribution outlets – based on an increased use of festivals, exhibitions, and cineclubs – rather than the large distribution networks which have a reduced number of film releases and are dominated by North American blockbusters or Brazilian comedies. It is more than simply a change in production methods or a change in the make‐up of the teams – professionals are now chosen from various regions in Brazil. Garage cinema seeks to recuperate the collective as a way of life which needs to be better understood within the film world (Migliorin 2012). Offering a counterpoint to programmes which are focused on individual auteurs,8 the search for collective experiences on the modern stage is as old as the avant‐garde (see Bishop 2012), which itself sought to integrate participative, collaborative, and relational proposals into its art forms (Bourriaud 2002). It is a programme which is present, indeed, in Brazil’s diverse languages, and it has been explored in greater depth in the fields of the visual arts, thea- tre, and performance rather than in film. Despite the experience of many filmmakers who have collaborated on each other’s film projects – and this has been common in Brazil since at least the days of cinema novo – it is true to say that when Estrada para Ythaca was released what caught everyone’s attention was the breaking down of hierarchies and the fact that the four directors were present during the filming and making of the film, and even played their part as actors and performers in the film.
https://www.academia.edu/31929764/Alumbramento_Friendship_and_Failure_New_Filmmaking_in_Brazil_in_the_Twenty_First_Century
Denilson LOpes 19.03.2017
RELEASE OF LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA COMPANION/ PLEASE RESEND THE INFORMATION Dear, Glad to take part in Latin America Cinema Companion org. Por Maria A. Delgado, Stephen Hart Randal Johnson para/for Wiley-Blackwell that can be found as ebook (https://www.amazon.com/Companion-Latin-American-Cinema-CNCZ-ebook/dp/B06XQ1FTJR/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1489846574&sr=1-5) or as a hardcover book (http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118552881.html) Down below you can find a description and a table of contents. Description A Companion to Latin American Cinema offers a wide-ranging collection of newly commissioned essays and interviews that explore the ways in which Latin American cinema has established itself on the international film scene in the twenty-first century. • Features contributions from international critics, historians, and scholars, along with interviews with acclaimed Latin American film directors • Includes essays on the Latin American film industry, as well as the interactions between TV and documentary production with feature film culture • Covers several up-and-coming regions of film activity such as nations in Central America • Offers novel insights into Latin American cinema based on new methodologies, such as the quantitative approach, and essays contributed by practitioners as well as theorists Table of Contents Notes on Contributors viii Acknowledgments xiv Introduction 1 Maria M. Delgado, Stephen M. Hart, and Randal Johnson Part I The Film Industry: Funding, Production, Distribution, Exhibition 19 1 Television and the Transformation of the Star System in Brazil 21 Randal Johnson 2 Stardom in Spanish America 36 Leah Kemp 3 Audiovisual Sector Incentives and Public Policy in Selected Latin American Countries 54 Steve Solot 4 Film, the Audiovisual, and New Technology in Latin America: Public Policy in the Context of Digital Convergence 71 Roque Gonzalez Translated by Franny Brogan and Randal Johnson 5 Film Funding Opportunities for Latin American Filmmakers: A Case for Further North–South Collaboration in Training and Film Festival Initiatives 85 Tamara Falicov 6 The Film Festival Circuit: Identity Transactions in a Translational Economy 99 Mar Diestro‐Dopido Part II Continental Currents: Documenting and Representing Identities 115 7 Latin American Documentary: A Political Trajectory 117 Michael Chanan 8 The Politics of Landscape 133 Jens Andermann 9 From Postmodernity to Post‐Identity: Latin American Film after the Great Divide 150 Geoffrey Kantaris 10 Indigenous Filmmaking in Latin America 167 Charlotte Gleghorn 11 What Is the Child for Latin American Cinema? Spectatorship, Mobility, and Authenticity in Pedro Gonzalez Rubio’s Alamar (2009) 187 Deborah Martin 12 Affect, Nostalgia, and Modernization: Popular Music in Twenty‐First‐Century Mexican and Chilean Cinema 201 Duncan Wheeler Part III National Cinemas: Initiatives, Movements, and Challenges 217 13 Memories of Cuban Cinema, 1959–2015 219 Joel del Rio and Enrique Colina Translated by Stephen M. Hart 14 Politics, Memory and Fiction(s) in Contemporary Argentine Cinema: The Kirchnerist Years 238 Maria M. Delgado and Cecilia Sosa 15 Neoliberalism and the Politics of Affect and Self‐Authorship in Contemporary Chilean Cinema 269 Joanna Page 16 Popular Cinema/Quality Television: A New Paradigm for the Mexican Mediascape 285 Paul Julian Smith 17 Alumbramento, Friendship, and Failure: New Filmmaking in Brazil in the Twenty‐First Century 294 Denilson Lopes Translated by Stephen M. Hart 18 The Reinvention of Colombian Cinema 307 Juana Suárez 19 Rendering the Invisible Visible: Reflections on the Costa Rican Film Industry in the Twenty‐First Century 325 Liz Harvey Part IV New Configurations: Travel, Technology, Television 341 20 The Horizontal Spread of a Vertical Malady: Cosmopolitanism and History in Pernambuco’s Recent Cinematic Sensation 343 Lucia Nagib 21 Artists’ Cinema in Brazil 357 Andre Parente Translated by Randal Johnson 22 Brazilian Film and Television in Times of Intermedia Diversification 375 Esther Hamburger 23 A Mexican in Hollywood or Hollywood in Mexico? Globalized Culture and Alfonso Cuaron’s Films 392 German Martinez Martinez 24 Latin American Cinema’s Trojan Horse 408 Stephen M. Hart and Owen Williams Part V The Interview Corner: Pragmatics and Praxis 431 25 “Finding the right balance”: An Interview with Martin Rejtman 433 Maria M. Delgado 26 “Escaping from an ordinary world into a more epic one”: An Interview with Alvaro Brechner 446 Maria M. Delgado 27 “The capacity to create mystery”: An Interview with Pablo Larrain 459 Maria M. Delgado 28 “A story might be similar from different places, but the language of representation is not”: An Interview with Jeannette Paillan 473 Charlotte Gleghorn 29 “Meeting points”: An Interview with Mariana Rondon and Marite Ugas 487 Maria M. Delgado 30 “Film is about connecting”: An Interview with Diego Luna 499 Maria M. Delgado 31 “The bridge between the others and us”: An Interview with Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu 509 Damon Wise Carxs Colegas e Amigxs, Contente por participar de A Companion to Latin American Cinema org. por Maria A. Delgado, Stephen e Hart Randal Johnson para Wiley-Blackwell que pode ser encontrado em ebook (https://www.amazon.com/Companion-Latin-American-Cinema-CNCZ-ebook/dp/B06XQ1FTJR/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1489846574&sr=1-5) ou livro (http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118552881.html) Segue abaixo informação e sumário do libro. Desde já grato se puderem repassar a quem possa se interesar. Atenciosamente, Denilson Lopes, ECO/UFRJ Description A Companion to Latin American Cinema offers a wide-ranging collection of newly commissioned essays and interviews that explore the ways in which Latin American cinema has established itself on the international film scene in the twenty-first century. • Features contributions from international critics, historians, and scholars, along with interviews with acclaimed Latin American film directors • Includes essays on the Latin American film industry, as well as the interactions between TV and documentary production with feature film culture • Covers several up-and-coming regions of film activity such as nations in Central America • Offers novel insights into Latin American cinema based on new methodologies, such as the quantitative approach, and essays contributed by practitioners as well as theorists Table of Contents Notes on Contributors viii Acknowledgments xiv Introduction 1 Maria M. Delgado, Stephen M. Hart, and Randal Johnson Part I The Film Industry: Funding, Production, Distribution, Exhibition 19 1 Television and the Transformation of the Star System in Brazil 21 Randal Johnson 2 Stardom in Spanish America 36 Leah Kemp 3 Audiovisual Sector Incentives and Public Policy in Selected Latin American Countries 54 Steve Solot 4 Film, the Audiovisual, and New Technology in Latin America: Public Policy in the Context of Digital Convergence 71 Roque Gonzalez Translated by Franny Brogan and Randal Johnson 5 Film Funding Opportunities for Latin American Filmmakers: A Case for Further North–South Collaboration in Training and Film Festival Initiatives 85 Tamara Falicov 6 The Film Festival Circuit: Identity Transactions in a Translational Economy 99 Mar Diestro‐Dopido Part II Continental Currents: Documenting and Representing Identities 115 7 Latin American Documentary: A Political Trajectory 117 Michael Chanan 8 The Politics of Landscape 133 Jens Andermann 9 From Postmodernity to Post‐Identity: Latin American Film after the Great Divide 150 Geoffrey Kantaris 10 Indigenous Filmmaking in Latin America 167 Charlotte Gleghorn 11 What Is the Child for Latin American Cinema? Spectatorship, Mobility, and Authenticity in Pedro Gonzalez Rubio’s Alamar (2009) 187 Deborah Martin 12 Affect, Nostalgia, and Modernization: Popular Music in Twenty‐First‐Century Mexican and Chilean Cinema 201 Duncan Wheeler Part III National Cinemas: Initiatives, Movements, and Challenges 217 13 Memories of Cuban Cinema, 1959–2015 219 Joel del Rio and Enrique Colina Translated by Stephen M. Hart 14 Politics, Memory and Fiction(s) in Contemporary Argentine Cinema: The Kirchnerist Years 238 Maria M. Delgado and Cecilia Sosa 15 Neoliberalism and the Politics of Affect and Self‐Authorship in Contemporary Chilean Cinema 269 Joanna Page 16 Popular Cinema/Quality Television: A New Paradigm for the Mexican Mediascape 285 Paul Julian Smith 17 Alumbramento, Friendship, and Failure: New Filmmaking in Brazil in the Twenty‐First Century 294 Denilson Lopes Translated by Stephen M. Hart 18 The Reinvention of Colombian Cinema 307 Juana Suárez 19 Rendering the Invisible Visible: Reflections on the Costa Rican Film Industry in the Twenty‐First Century 325 Liz Harvey Part IV New Configurations: Travel, Technology, Television 341 20 The Horizontal Spread of a Vertical Malady: Cosmopolitanism and History in Pernambuco’s Recent Cinematic Sensation 343 Lucia Nagib 21 Artists’ Cinema in Brazil 357 Andre Parente Translated by Randal Johnson 22 Brazilian Film and Television in Times of Intermedia Diversification 375 Esther Hamburger 23 A Mexican in Hollywood or Hollywood in Mexico? Globalized Culture and Alfonso Cuaron’s Films 392 German Martinez Martinez 24 Latin American Cinema’s Trojan Horse 408 Stephen M. Hart and Owen Williams Part V The Interview Corner: Pragmatics and Praxis 431 25 “Finding the right balance”: An Interview with Martin Rejtman 433 Maria M. Delgado 26 “Escaping from an ordinary world into a more epic one”: An Interview with Alvaro Brechner 446 Maria M. Delgado 27 “The capacity to create mystery”: An Interview with Pablo Larrain 459 Maria M. Delgado 28 “A story might be similar from different places, but the language of representation is not”: An Interview with Jeannette Paillan 473 Charlotte Gleghorn 29 “Meeting points”: An Interview with Mariana Rondon and Marite Ugas 487 Maria M. Delgado 30 “Film is about connecting”: An Interview with Diego Luna 499 Maria M. Delgado 31 “The bridge between the others and us”: An Interview with Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu 509 Damon Wise
https://www.amazon.com/Companion-Latin-American-Cinema-CNCZ-ebook/dp/B06XQ1FTJR/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1489846574&sr=1-5
Petra Matić 18.03.2017
OPTICAL SOUND Exhibition / Concert / Workshops / Panels 21/3-31/3/2017 School of Applied Arts and Design Zagreb, Croatia
https://www.facebook.com/events/885152608293917/
Randall Packer 18.03.2017
Videofreex pioneers Skip Blumberg, Nancy Cain, and Mary Curtis Ratcliff discuss their reinvention of television in the 1970s as a social broadcast medium ::: Monday, March 27, 9:00pm-10:00pm (EDT -US) (UTC-4) ::: Networked Conversations is hosted by Randall Packer ::: live & online via Internet chat.
https://www.facebook.com/events/801709803318856/
Fumi Hirota 17.03.2017
[New Release] International Symposium for Media Art "Art & Technology: Changing Times, Contemporary Trends, Future Platforms" Report [PDF ver.] http://jfac.jp/en/culture/news/art-and-technology-report-170317/ --- International Symposium for Media Art "Art & Technology: Changing Times, Contemporary Trends, Future Platforms" --- 【Report [PDF ver.] English version】 ■[Session 1 | Lectures] Media Art: Historical Shifts in Japan and Hybridity of Asia - The Transition of Art and Technology in Japan …Minoru Hatanaka - Shifting the Divide: Artistic Positions of Media Convergence and Cultural Diversity …Yvonne Spielmann ■[Session 2 | Presentations] Case Studies in the Interface between Socio-Technology and Art - Rhizomatiks: 10 Years of Activity …Daito Manabe - Professional Amateurs …Andreas Siagian - The Art to Come (and Where It Came from) …Jeffrey Shaw ■[Session 3 | Discussion] Tokyo’s Range of Possibilities as a Platform for Media Art …Jeffrey Shaw × Andreas Siagian × Daito Manabe × Minoru Hatanaka | Kazunao Abe ■[Contribution] - An Asian Positioning on Media Art …Masaki Fujihata
http://jfac.jp/en/culture/news/art-and-technology-report-170317/
Joseph Nechvatal 16.03.2017
Timothy Druckrey (ed.): Electronic Culture: Technology and Visual Representation (1996) https://monoskop.org/log/?p=18353 A rich compilation of essays by some of today's leading theorists and media critics, this book gathers a series of explorations into diverse forms of visualizations in a cultural environment wired into the global network.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10211078224448030&set=gm.1056470764459662&type=3
Laura Welzenbach 17.03.2017
Eyebeam's Open Call for the Tech by Artist Residency is online now. This years theme is TRUST. APPLY :)
http://eyebeam.org/events/trust/
Tom Sherman 17.03.2017
Nerve Theory: How It Came to Be and Where It Has Gone...
http://kunstradio.at/TEXTS/nerve.html
Heloisa Amaral 16.03.2017
Registrations are now open for the Orpheus Academy 2017: Futures of the Contemporary with Paulo de Assis, Michael Schwab, Peter Osborne, Claus Steffen Mahnkopf, Babette Babich, Chaya Czernowin and Heiner Goebbels
http://www.orpheusinstituut.be/en/events/futures-of-the-contemporary
Jussi Parikka 15.03.2017
A PhD summer school in May on Media Archaeology at Concordia, in Montreal. "This course deals with the theory, current practice, and possible trajectories of media archaeology as a discipline. Our object of study will be the research collection of the new Residual Media Depot of the Media History Research Centre at the Milieux Institute. Work will consist of a mix of writing, thinking, talking, and hands-on encounters with materials from the collection, according to student skills and interests." More info (or get in touch if questions please)
http://residualmedia.net/classes/
Marc Garrett 13.03.2017
Natan Karczmar 14.03.2017
ATELIER VIDEOCOLLECTIF 1 GG GABRIEL GMAIL A NOTER SUR VOS AGENDAS : JEUDI 16 MARS 17 H DIGITAL LOUNGE SALLE CHAVIGNIER 3ème étage, Maison de la culture, entrée rue Abbé de l'épée Rendez-vous avec Natan Karczmar, initiateur du projet VIDEOCOLLECTIF pour un échange informel avec les auteurs des VIDEOCOLLECTIFS 2017. VIDEOCOLLECTIF est développé en partenariat entre le SUC, le POLE DES RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES de la ville de Clermont-Ferrand et VIDEOFORMES; Gabriel Soucheyre Responsable L3 Culture et Patrimoine/ Livre & Multimédia gabriel.soucheyre@uca.fr Département métiers de la culture Université Clermont Auvergne 29, Bd Gergovia 63037Clermont-Ferrand www.uca.fr UNIVERSITE CLERMONT AUVERGNE
http://www.uca.fr/